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Coaches Corner: Getting to know Coach Rennard Woodmore

Coaches Corner: Getting to know Coach Rennard Woodmore

Coach Woodmore

Coach Rennard Woodmore came to Adamsville High School five years ago and quickly fell in love with the school and it's students. “It is a small school and I have great co-workers. The kids are mannerly and everyone gets along here,” said Woodmore. 

Woodmore, 29, was born in Hendersonville, TN and was raised in Trousdale County, where he attended high school, lettering all four years in baseball, basketball and football. 

Woodmore played running back and linebacker on the school football team, which lost only four games during his time there while winning two Class A State Championships.

After graduating he moved on to Jackson State Community College for two years where he played third base and outfield on the baseball team.

After two years at JSCC, Rennard moved on to Lambuth where he continued his baseball career. He then spent one year at Lambuth as a graduate assistant coach, which jump started his coaching career. 

Woodmore then made the move to Henderson, TN, where he still resides, and AHS, where he serves as assistant baseball coach, defensive coordinator of the  football team and teaches physical education.

When asked about his coaching goals, Woodmore said, “I really want to be a head football coach in the next five years. I would not mind being a baseball coach, but I love football. You strategize all week and then you go out there Friday night and see who did the best job.”

We then asked Coach Woodmore several rapid fire questions as follows.

Q. When did you know you wanted to be a coach?

A. When I finished playing at Lambuth, I got the chance to be a grad assistant in baseball for one year and I loved it. “It fit like a glove.” I like helping young men better their skills.

Q. Who inspired you to get in to coaching?

A. My high school football coach, Clint Satterfield, who won six state titles before retiring from coaching. I find myself using some of his old sayings. “Tough times don't last, tough people do. Hard work is like medicine, it doesn't taste good going down, but it makes you better. “

Q. Who has been most influential in your life?

A. My parents. My dad always took time to individually coach me growing up. My mom was always there for support. Whenever I talk to her, before we hang up, she says”Don't forget to pray.”

Q. What part do you think coaches play in the lives of young people?

A. We help mold their future and lives. Sports teaches them to get up when you get knocked down and not give up. Young people need structure.

Q. What are your most and least favorite things about coaching?

A. Favorite thing is when a kid comes back three or four years after they graduate and saying “Thank You” and having them say that something we said or did inspired them to go further than they otherwise would have. 

Least favorite is losing. No matter what it is, I want to win. Everything is competitive. 

Q. What is the most memorable moment of your coaching career up till now?

A. In 2010 postseason baseball play we came back and defeated Greenfield 10-9 after being down 9-6 and down to our last time to bat, clinching our spot in the state tournament.

Q. If you could spend an evening with any three people, past or present, who would it be, and why?

A. Former UCLA coach John Wooden, because he had his “Pyramid of Success”, and won so many championships. How did he continue to motivate his players?

Former NFL superstar wide receiver, Jerry Rice, to ask him about his amazing work ethic and how he managed to outwork everyone else. 

Former NBA player and coach, Phil Jackson, to find out he dealt with so many egos, Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant. How he managed to win ten titles and keep everyone on the same page.

Q. What advice would you give others considering getting in to coaching?

A. Our society can never have too many good coaches. Coaches help shape and form young lives in a positive way.

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